Iron Council by China Miéville

Iron Council Iron CouncilChina Miéville; Del Rey/Ballantine Books 2004WorldCatRead OnlineLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

This is the third Bas Lag book. It doesn’t really have any characters in common with any of the other two, but the completely awesome world is the same. The book originally starts as two stories, and they intertwine and meet at the end. It’s a little more political than the previous two, but if you love the Bas Lag setting, you should love this book.

Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

Mortal Engines Mortal Engines: a novelPhilip Reeve; HarperCollins 2003WorldCatRead OnlineLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

Mortal Engines is the first book in the Hungry City Chronicles. They’re set about 2000 years in the future. Sometime in the near future, there is a Sixty Minutes’ War. This wreaks enough havoc (kills the continent of North America and creates a chain of volcanos in Europe) that after a few hundred years, some folks cut up some cities and put them on treads with massive engines. Municipal Darwinism is the idea that all cities should be on treads and mobile, and stronger, more worthy cities will run down the weaker ones and salvage their parts and inhabitants.

Add in airships, Old Tech, and the fact that at least one civilization bloomed and died between modern day and the world in Mortal Engines, and you’ve got the setting.

If you liked Airborn, you will likely like this. The characters are a little more three-dimensional than in Airborn.

The Tuloriad by John Ringo

The Tuloriad The TuloriadJohn Ringo; Baen Books 2009WorldCatRead OnlineLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

I thoroughly enjoyed Ringo’s first four novels. I read the next 10 or so. I no longer enjoy them. I don’t know if his earlier novels were more carefully edited, or if perhaps he’s more confident in his current stuff, but I think I will no longer put John Ringo stuff at the top of my To Read list.